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4-26-20

Building off of the three previous talks Fred has given in the past month, Fred reviews the teachings and practices of the Three Fierce Mantas, powerful words that can cut through our confusion and anxiety in this life. Fred reviews the Five Remembrances and how we can reflect on them and put them into practice as well as the teachings on the six human "sicknesses" or "knacks" and how they habitually arise and manifest in our daily lives.

Fred asks us to examine our own life and practice and to ask ourselves "Am I Taking Dharma Medicine As Prescribed? Am I reflecting on the teachings, so they will be useful and of benefit to me?" Fred illuminates the three steps the Buddha gave to listen to the teachings, to reflect on the teachings, and then if they make sense to us; to practice them in our daily life.

4-19-20

In this talk, Dharma teacher Fred Eppsteiner explains the six human "sicknesses" or "knacks" and how they habitually arise and manifest in our daily lives. If we examine our lives closely, we may notice these "knacks" such as the knack for neediness, for being naughty, for violence, for laziness and carelessness, for being dependent, and for wrong view.

However through awareness of our life and our actions of body, speech, and mind, we can not only see how these sicknesses afflict us; but can see a way to health and well-being. Fred goes into details on how we can travel the Dharma road to health by cultivating being satisfied with oneself and one's life; cultivating a knack for goodness and virtue; cultivating a knack for protecting life and nonviolence; cultivating a knack for diligence and discipline; cultivating a knack for self responsibility and empowerment; and to cultivate a knack for right view.

In this talk, Dharma teacher Fred Eppsteiner continues to explains that during this time of changing instability, and increasing sense of uncertainty, a Dharma practice is needed more than ever. Fred shows us how we can practice with the seventh mindfulness training of the Order of Interbeing "Dwelling Happily in the Present Moment."

The Seventh Mindfulness Training: Dwelling Happily in the Present Moment

"Aware that life is available only in the present moment, we are committed to training ourselves to live deeply each moment of daily life. We will try not to lose ourselves in dispersion or be carried away by regrets about the past, worries about the future, or craving, anger, or jealousy in the present. We will practice mindful breathing to be aware of what is happening in the here and the now. We are determined to learn the art of mindful living by touching the wondrous, refreshing, and healing elements that are inside and around us, in all situations. In this way, we will be able to cultivate seeds of joy, peace, love, and understanding in ourselves, thus facilitating the work of transformation and healing in our consciousness. We are aware that real happiness depends primarily on our mental attitude and not on external conditions, and that we can live happily in the present moment simply by remembering that we already have more than enough conditions to be happy."

 
 

March 29th 2020, Tampa

 

In this talk, Dharma teacher Fred Eppsteiner explains that during this time of changing instability, and increasing sense of uncertainty, a Dharma practice is needed more than ever. Fred shows us how we can stay calm on the boat during the storm. He asks us to examine what we are nourishing our mind with? We have to be careful with this overload of information. What is it really doing for our mind? We examine our life in this way for our own benefit and the benefit of others.

3-15-20

In this Dharma talk, Fred Eppsteiner expands upon the Lojong teachings within the point "Transforming Adversity Into the Path of Awakening" in light of the COVID-19 situation.

Fred also shares the Three Fierce Mantas, powerful words that can cut through our confusion and anxiety in this life. Our resistance to the unfolding of life, especially those situations unwanted or unexpected, is a primary cause of our emotional ups and downs. Our difficulty in accepting the experiences of life and the people in it for what they are and imposing our own needs and wants fuels an unending circus of negative emotions and conflictual mind states. Our desire to live peacefully in the present moment and practice mindful living becomes continually up-ended by our habitual dysfunctional responses.

The Three Fierce Mantras ~ Tsangpo Gyare, 12th century Tibetan Buddhist Ascetic

“Whatever has to happen, let it happen!"

“Whatever the situation is, it’s fine!"

“I don’t need anything whatsoever!”

March 8, 2020
 
In this talk, Dharma teacher Fred Eppsteiner introduces the Yogacara tradition's understanding of the structure of our mind and how it functions. He explains how understanding how the mind works in this way can help us be clear on how we need to work with our minds in order to free ourselves of suffering and develop a happy mind.

March 1, 2020 

In this talk, Dharma teacher Fred Eppsteiner comments on a Zen koan titled "Zuigan Calls His Own Master" from "The Gateless Gate" (Mumonkan) a collection of koans compiled in the 13th century by the Chinese Zen master Wumen Huikai. Fred elaborated on the teachings which inspire us to "be awake", "don't be deceived", and to realize the masks we wear in this life. By practicing these wonderful teachings we all have the capacity to wake up and become Buddhas in this lifetime.

8-31-19 | Tampa

Our resistance to the unfolding of life, especially those situations unwanted or unexpected, is a primary cause of our emotional ups and downs. Our difficulty in accepting the experiences of life and the people in it for what they are and imposing our own needs and wants fuels an unending circus of negative emotions and conflictual mind states. Our desire to live peacefully in the present moment and practice mindful living becomes continually up-ended by our habitual dysfunctional responses.

 

In this day long retreat, Dharma teacher Fred Eppsteiner led retreatants in the study and practice of "The Three Fierce Mantras."

January 18, 2020

In this talk from a Daylong Retreat, Dharma teacher Fred Eppsteiner explains how to truly live in the present moment. Fred shows us how we can develop two different, yet inextricably connected capacities of living in the present moment:  (1) cultivating stillness and stability of mind that is capable of being present in calmness to whatever is manifesting in the moment; and  (2) bringing forth the ability with mindfulness, courage, and compassion to ride the waves of emotionality or uncomfortable sensations, with greater presence, intelligence and ease.

 

True Refuge

January 12, 2020

In this talk, Dharma teacher Fred Eppsteiner explains what it means to take refuge and asks the question, “where do we go for refuge?” Fred explains how we can go to refuge in the Buddha, Dharma, and Sangha so that we can relax and know we are no longer lost in this life.

 

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